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julieta79  
#1 Posted : Monday, December 30, 2013 6:52:04 PM(UTC)
julieta79

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Joined: 12/30/2013(UTC)
Posts: 8
United States
Location: Los Angeles

My baby boy who is turning 9 months in two days is unable to say "ma" or "da" yet...he is really trying to talk but all he can come up with is long sentences of vowels, or grunting sounds "aga", or "aka". I have not heard any consonants yet, and I am starting to worry somewhat.

He is trying to stand up these days, but he can't sit still. He has been crawling for few months, and all of his other development milestones are on track. He sometimes says "aaaa" and I repeat it, and he typically responds as if we have short conversations that sound like yelling. but not copying speech yet.

He is also not waving yet, and doesn't clap his hands yet. He does know his name, and sometimes he turns and smiles when I call him, but that is about 30-40% of the time. If he is busy with a toy, or crawling, he would not pay attention to my calls.

He is social, and he is trying to stare at people in the store until they turn and smile at him. Once they do, he smiles back and is very happy. He also recently started to dislike to be alone in his room, and he will cry immediately if he is left alone (separation anxiety)

I wonder if the "not babbling yet" is a problem at 9 months or not yet?
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Mary Lou SLP  
#2 Posted : Monday, December 30, 2013 9:53:04 PM(UTC)
Mary Lou SLP

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Hi Julieta79,

It's great that you are observing your son's abilities so closely. It's always good to have "next steps" in mind to guide your child toward experiencing and accomplishing.

As you said, his motor skills appear to be developing well for his age.

That's great that he stares at people, waiting for them to take notice of him, and that he smiles back and is happy with the attention. Turning toward you when you say his name is good. It's likely very normal that he gets engrossed in play and doesn't always turn to your voice--I'd suggest just keeping tabs on that as he grows.

With speech development, we do encourage turn taking, so your back-and-forth exchange with the "aaaaa" sound is great. Since you want to hear him use some consonants, how about aiming for "mama" by prolonging the sounds, as in saying, "mmmmmaaaaaa mmmmmmaaaaaaaa" and see what he does in return. You can put the palm of his hand on your face near your mouth as you do it, and then put the palm of his hand on his face, with a happy, expectant look on your face to encourage him to take a turn. If he doesn't, after a long pause, you can say it again. The m sound is a good one, since you can prolong it.

When he cries for you when he wakes up, try modeling, "MAMA! Mama! Mama!" as you near his room. Play a sort of peek-a-boo as you begin to enter his room, which hopefully will distract him from his crying. It is best to pick him up when he is calm rather than when he is crying. As you pick him up, continue to model "mama!" in your soothing voice. Use that word a lot throughout the week, and see if he perks up to it and even tries to imitate it.

You mentioned he isn't waving yet. Does that mean you are doing a lot of waving? Wave good bye to everyone and everything. You do it, and then pause to give him a chance to try. You can give his hand or arm a little nudge. Be sure you are showing him what to do and not just telling him what to do.

Let's see if some others on this forum will comment, too.

I hope you will continue to write about new things your son tries or any other concerns you have. Certainly, have a good discussion with his doctor at his one-year check-up. If you feel something isn't going right for your son in his speech-language development, I urge you to say so and to speak up about it. There are early intervention services in all states (under various names). You are entitled to use this service. It is available to serve children at no charge from birth to the third birthday. Some children do need some extra assistance to get their speech-language skills moving along. I am among those who advocate providing focused stimulation and not just watching and waiting. To me, there is no downside to enriched stimulation for children.

I hope you and your son have a great-talking year ahead!

Sincerely,

Mary Lou
Mary Lou B. Johnson, M.S.,CCC-SLP

http://www.HelpYourChildSpeak.com
Jennifer  
#3 Posted : Wednesday, January 8, 2014 4:59:25 PM(UTC)
Jennifer

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I think MaryLou's comments are great, another thing or two I would mention is
1) have you had his hearing checked?- maybe a quick screen at the doc's office just to rule that out if its never been checked. As Marylou suggested, make sure you are discussing any concerns with your pediatrician!
2)Its great that you are vocally turn taking with him and that he will imitate you and have a "conversation" ! I agree with Marylou, starting with /m/ is also good because it is so easy to see how its made. ( "b, p, k, g, a" may also be good because they are visible and/or they are already in is repertoire). vocal turn taking is so important. As you play vocally back and forth he is getting more and more practice-
3)You may also consider pairing a sign/gesture with your words such as "mama". This helps give him a way to communicate with you until he is able to say it (as well as learn words).

In addition- in regard to "babbling", it does generally develop in stages. From "reduplicated/repetitive" such as "babababa" to "variegated" as in "babidodu". These generally occur before and after the first words develop.
julieta79  
#4 Posted : Saturday, January 11, 2014 11:36:59 AM(UTC)
julieta79

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 12/30/2013(UTC)
Posts: 8
United States
Location: Los Angeles

Thank you so much for your comments! I am learning so much about speech development, and it is a complicated process!

I was greatly intrigued by the comments that "babbling" happens in stages. Is there a pre-babbling stage?

For the last 5 days, my son began to explore the "b"...he doesn't babble anything in canonical speech-like manner, but we can hear lots of play with "b". He would accidentally say "ba", "bu", "beep", "aba", and even "baba". These are mixed with his other non-speech sounds like blowing raspberries, and hissing etc.

In addition, when we leave him alone in his crib, instead of crying as he used to, he now uses "m". He would begin a long complain saying "mmmmmmmmmmmmmm", "mmmmmmmmmmmmmm", then he will progress to "maaaaaaaaaaaaaaammmm", and we also heard several "Mama". Obviously, these were more like accidents, but he seems to be playing with "m" sound as well for the last 3 days.

His non-verbal sounds change form day to day too...one day he would hiss like a cat, next day will be "brrr", and then something close to "k", like "kkkiiikkkkooou", but not as clean as normal "k".

I was wondering is cannonical babbling seen in most normally developing babies, and is this mandatory in order to learn to speek? In addition, is copying and mimicking mandatory pre-babbling phase? My boy typically doesn't copy waving bye bye, hand clapping, etc. He is much more interested to copy his dad if he is banging a spoon over his toy rather than copying sounds, or gestures. In other words, his mimicking skills are still very subtle, not obvious. The only thing that he recently started to do is stick tongue after me (sometime), lifts hands to show he wants to be picked up, and he does return smiles most of the time.

Hearing seems to be fine...he wakes up from the sound of the door opening.

I am so interested to hear more about your experiences.
Mary Lou SLP  
#5 Posted : Saturday, January 11, 2014 4:10:19 PM(UTC)
Mary Lou SLP

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Hi julieta79,

I'm glad you wrote back!

Babies usually coo before they babble. Cooing is made up of undifferentiated sounds mostly made by voicing at the larynx when air is moving through as the child moves his body. There can be squeaks, squeezed sounds, pitch changes--all sorts of generic sounds. Babbling occurs when sounds are more like those used in language--any and all of the languages of the world. Then the babbling consists of the sounds in the language(s) the child is actually hearing in daily interactions with parents and other people who talk to him. Yes, most children babble. You asked if it was mandatory to learning to speak. I can't say that 100% of people who talk babbled first, but it's probably close!

Keep up your back-and-forth imitations of each other in both sound-making and actions (banging, waving, etc.) Try try try to talk face-to-face with your child about all sorts of things throughout the day. Anything and everything if fair game to talk about at this stage. Remember to pause to let the words and sounds "soak in" and to give him a chance to talk vocal turns, if he wants to.

I hope you will continue to write as your son moves through various phases of his speech-language development!

Have fun!

Mary Lou
Mary Lou B. Johnson, M.S.,CCC-SLP

http://www.HelpYourChildSpeak.com
julieta79  
#6 Posted : Monday, January 13, 2014 1:26:11 PM(UTC)
julieta79

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 12/30/2013(UTC)
Posts: 8
United States
Location: Los Angeles

Dear Mary Lou,

I have NO WORDS to express my gratitude that you encourage me to write, and comment on my posts (along with Jennifer). My baby has had another health scare that put us in a grey area for genetic disorder (he has genetic potential for CF, and no symptoms, hence, he *might* develop some milder form or *might* be completely healthy forever). Our life has been a battery fo tests for every little cough etc, so that I am on the verge of panic attack everytime something is late.

I am really really worried of autism, or other development delays due to the speech delay. I can't sleep or eat, all I wish is to hear babbling, or at least the baby trying to copy/imitate me. It is not fun :(

Here is the current progress for the last two days. He is "talking" much more, mostly saying "agagoguga", "agagaguh" and things with "g". It doesn't sound like the classic babbling as I hear on youtube videos where kids say "bababaababa" or "gagagagaagagaa", but it looks like he is "talking" like his own speech. msotly with "g" sound. Is this still cooing? He also says "abu", "bip", "ama" and etc, while just 3 weeks ago, I barely heard any consonants. The copying skills are still subtle, as if I stick my tongue, he would prefer to stare at me, and try to grab my tongue with his two fingers rather than copying me.

On the other front, he recently learned to hold his bottle alone, and is now constantly drinking from the bottle, and sometimes babbling to the bottle. He is also constantly pulling in his crib, and trying to stand up all the time.

Do you mind letting me know at what age is time to seek early intervention? Do you think he is having progress,as mentioned above? How much should I worry about autism, and is it more obvious than babbling delay?
Mary Lou SLP  
#7 Posted : Monday, January 13, 2014 10:35:37 PM(UTC)
Mary Lou SLP

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Hi Julieta,

I enjoy these back-and-forth "conversations". You show that you are a very good observer, and you have noticed some very good changes in a short time. Your examples certainly do sound like babbling.

Keep watching, keep chatting and playing with your son, and keep smiling and having fun! A lot can happen in the next few months. How about seeing this as "prime input" time and try not to think too much about what could be "going wrong". At your son's one-year well-check with his pediatrician, that would be a great time to mention your concerns and get your doctor's input. I would say that if you have concerns that your son isn't saying enough words for your comfort level by the time he is 16-18 months old, that would be a good time to talk with your doctor again about getting an assessment from a speech-language pathologist.

Did your son have a newborn hearing screening? Did he pass it?

I am sorry to hear you have some worries about CF, but it's great that you have already been linked to genetics for studies.

I am even more sorry to hear that you are so worried about your son that you aren't eating and sleeping well. It is very important for you and your son that you keep up your energy and your spirits. If you continue to experience this difficulty (eating and sleeping--and other things, too?) how about talking with your own doctor and/or making an appointment with a counselor? This could be very helpful to you.

Talk, smile, play, hug, engage with your son!

I hope you will write again.

Best wishes!

Mary Lou
Mary Lou B. Johnson, M.S.,CCC-SLP

http://www.HelpYourChildSpeak.com
julieta79  
#8 Posted : Wednesday, January 15, 2014 12:18:23 PM(UTC)
julieta79

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Joined: 12/30/2013(UTC)
Posts: 8
United States
Location: Los Angeles

Hello dear Mary Lou,

I am so happy to report that today, baby Kristian officially began a "classic" babbler at age of 9.5 months. He woke up, stood up in his crib, and started long conversation "Gagagaga gagagaga gagagu"...this went on for an hour or so, to my great delight :) Hopefully, we will soon learn "baba" and "mama" Thanky uo so much for your gerat help and advice...I am so greateful :)
Mary Lou SLP  
#9 Posted : Wednesday, January 15, 2014 10:34:39 PM(UTC)
Mary Lou SLP

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Joined: 1/21/2008(UTC)
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Wow! Babbling for an hour! Your little guy went from zero to 60 in a short amount of time.

You sound very relieved. Good!

Now, keep up your excellent observations and keep talking to your son. This is prime time for him to be soaking up the information he needs to gain from hearing you talk to him.

I hope you will write again--perhaps when he is making word-like utterances or real words!

Best wishes!

Mary Lou
Mary Lou B. Johnson, M.S.,CCC-SLP

http://www.HelpYourChildSpeak.com
julieta79  
#10 Posted : Monday, January 20, 2014 2:34:45 PM(UTC)
julieta79

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 12/30/2013(UTC)
Posts: 8
United States
Location: Los Angeles

Dear Mary Lou,

Since you are so kind to encourage me to write back, I am :) Baby Kristian is 9 months and 20 days old now. He is still not making the "classic" babbling by stringing bababaa or mamamaa yet , although I hope/pray he is very close. Today he is babbling all day long, saying Uga Uga Uga Uga. Yesterday, he liked to say Gu Gu Gu, Bu bu bu, and alternating them. I think he still prefers the back of the throat consonants such as G and K. We also heard few Ma todays, and several Ammma. I hope this is some form of babbling, and he will soon transition into reduplicating mamamama or babababa.Overall, I think he is learning to speak, although he is not babbling by the book yet. Maybe he is close?!?!

He just started to copy sounds. As before, if I make a silly sound, he would smile, but since two days ago, he repeats it back. It is mostly vowels. If I add a consonant, like Ammmm, he would get shy and try to repeat, but mostly vowels. If I say yayyy, he would copy exactly yayy with my own intonation.

Overall, I feel a little more confident that he is trying to babble. I really really really will be so happy if I hear a stable reduplicating of sounds involving front of the mouth M or B. Do most kids string these two letters, and use reduplicate babbling before speech?

Mary Lou SLP  
#11 Posted : Monday, January 20, 2014 9:46:41 PM(UTC)
Mary Lou SLP

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Hi Julieta,

You are reporting a lot of sound and syllable variety. That is great! And, it's fun, right? It sounds like you are enjoying saying sounds, syllables, and words to your son, and he is trying to imitate you. That is what is important--talking a lot together throughout the day and having fun!

In terms of what "most" children do at this stage (your question), I'd suggest you focus just as you are doing on what your son is doing and the changes you note daily.

Keep talking to and with your son. Keep writing on the forum! Lots of parents (who read the posts and don't add their own) will benefit from the experiences you write about.

Mary Lou
Mary Lou B. Johnson, M.S.,CCC-SLP

http://www.HelpYourChildSpeak.com
Jennifer  
#12 Posted : Tuesday, January 21, 2014 3:48:42 PM(UTC)
Jennifer

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Dear Julieta79,
I am so happy to hear about how quickly Kristian is improving. It sounds to me like he is using the reduplicated babbling with the back sounds (k, g) pretty well for you. Often kids begin using these back sounds /k, g/ before they start using the sounds at the front of the mouth (m, b for example). Also you asked earlier about the babbling stages. It generally goes as follows: after cooing mentioned earlier (i.e. "ooh, goo, ug"), comes the reduplicated babbling ("bababa, gagaga, mamama"). At around 10-12 months it may begin to change to the variegated type of babbling (ie. "babiguga") but remember every child is unique and may not follow the exact same path as everyone else. I have seen kids that seemed to not follow the norm, and move right into speech (sometimes with intervention , sometimes not). These are just general guidelines based an averages. As Marylou suggested, don't get too hung up on the "when", because each child may develop at their own pace. It is most important to focus on the daily interactions and "conversations" or vocal turn taking that you are doing. He seems interested and interactive with you. Keep it going! I do think it is good though for any parent that suspects a speech delay to consider a speech/language evaluation, particularly if they do not know any strategies to help jump start their kids speech/language. Early intervention has been helpful for many families.
julieta79  
#13 Posted : Thursday, February 6, 2014 2:36:56 PM(UTC)
julieta79

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Joined: 12/30/2013(UTC)
Posts: 8
United States
Location: Los Angeles

Dear MaryLou and Jennifer,

I wanted to post an update because I am being contacted by many moms in the same boat from various forums.
Here is where we stand now...Baby Kristian flipped from Ak Ak Ak and Uga Uga sounds to Baba and Gaga strings a week before turning ten months old. He would repeat Baba all day long, and alternate it with Gaga. He even used to wake up at 2 am to practice! This great phase lasted for a week, and he stopped babbling those. For the last five days, we don't hear stringing of consonants as much, but we do hear that he is starting to use "d" sound from time to time, such as "dee", "dadee", and "da". He is not reduplicating them yet, but hopefully soon! At the same time, his newest development is he is starting to "talk" to himself, sort of like either singing or mumbling rhytmic words. The problem with those is the consonants are not clear. Hence, he is not saying vowel-only words, but I can not tell what the consonants are, because they are hard to distinguish. Yet, it sounds like he is sort of "talking", definietly not screaming or marginal babbling. I really hope to hear clear consonants, and maybe first words with meaning within a month or two !!!!

On a second note, when I was really worried about the babbling a month ago, I sent voice sample to some linguistic experts who write about baby vocalization. One was kind enough to explain that my baby is indeed babbling, but he has a whats called "reverse" babbling pattern. hence, he picked to start with "k" or "g" and added the front consonant "b" a little later. In addition, even if there wasn't "clear" babbling in some of my voice tapes, I was told that he has many "rhytmic" syllables, which are typical for his age. Also, he was whispering "Bababa" without sound, and that is also some kind of canonical babbling. I was told that I should not worry much if he abandons some sounds, or even re-gresses a little after some good babbling days, because what matters is whether he "CAN" babble the consonants, and has intention to communicate.

For the mothers out there, who are as worried as myself, I have to add that there was a three week period of huge expansion of voice sounds, and tongue clicks, and brrrr sounds right before the onset of babbling. So maye your baby is on the verge of babbling...hang in there!!!

In addition, we do see that he learned to babble with "b" and "g", but he did this for a week only, and stopped. I hope this is normal, and will pick up some babbling again soon. I guess this is not a "perfect" process! Luckily, I have sound sample from evey day, so I can play the "baba"s to remind myself that my little guy is making progress!!!
julieta79  
#14 Posted : Wednesday, February 19, 2014 4:33:44 PM(UTC)
julieta79

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Joined: 12/30/2013(UTC)
Posts: 8
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Location: Los Angeles

Hi there Mary Lou and Jennifer,

I have a new question for you ladies, as you have been ABSOLUTELY amazing in helping me. My child is 10 months and 2 weeks old now, and I have seen lots of improvement since my initial question a month and a half ago. Let me recap...at first, he babbled Gagaga, which was soon replaced by Uga Uga and Ak Ak. Around a week before ten months of age, he started to babble with "b", saying babababa all day long. This reduplicative babbling was soon abandoned, and he no longer babbles this way. He went quiet for several days, and completely stopped babbling. In few days, we started to hear "dii dii" or "baba", or "gaga" here and there, but these are not that often...I would say about 2-3 per day. For the last week or so, he sometime attempts to "talk"to his toy. For example, yesterday he was saying " baba ege ada ek bugi abuga" during a "talking" session with his toy. He also sometime uses "w", "h" and "t" such as "awa ete ete ete aha ek".

These variegated syllables are great, but the problem is I don't hear them very often. I hear these maybe few times when he wakes up, and once or twice here and there during the day. There are days with no babbling at all, although he is vocalizing other sounds. His preferred vocalization during the day is "screaming" with joy all day long, giggling, and laughing. He also still really likes to make throat clearing sounds, clicking sounds, and blow raspberries. I would say that his adult-like syllables are about 10% of his vocalization. Seems like he wants to attract attention in the public places by screaming, and laughing right after...he seems to be anjoying his voice a lot.

In your experience, is he supposed to produce more adult-like syllables more often at this age? I wonder whether I should seek EI or not. My ped believes that he is on track and I should give him more time.I understand that pediatricians are not speech experts.

Please share your opinion, if possible.


Mary Lou SLP  
#15 Posted : Saturday, February 22, 2014 11:32:38 AM(UTC)
Mary Lou SLP

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Hi Julieta,

The variety of sounds your son is making seems very good. I hear your concern that he does not babble very much during the day. My suggestion is that you provide him with as much face-to-face babbling and talking to him as possible. Talk about the pictures in simple picture books, talk while playing, talk about everything that is happening during all interactions (bathing, dressing, diaper-changing, getting food ready, etc.) In terms of the shrieking to get attention, I'd try not to reinforce that and to provide models for alternative things he might attempt to produce, such as saying "ee", "oo", "wow" "uh oh" or some other more speech-like sound or syllable. I wouldn't say "no", since, as you say, he is enjoying using his voice; I would just suggest trying to redirect his vocal effort with fun sound play other than screaming.

I think EI is good to explore whenever a parent has a concern. Why not make a contact now? It could take a little while to get service started anyway. When a parent and child receive some EI support, there is a dual benefit of giving a child more time and getting input about how to shape some developmental skill development.

Please share your thoughts about this! I hope some parents who have used EI services will weigh in on this discussion.

Mary Lou
Mary Lou B. Johnson, M.S.,CCC-SLP

http://www.HelpYourChildSpeak.com
julieta79  
#16 Posted : Monday, February 24, 2014 12:17:34 PM(UTC)
julieta79

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 12/30/2013(UTC)
Posts: 8
United States
Location: Los Angeles

Hi Mary Lou,

I took your advise right away, and made an appointment with a very reputable speech therapist for this week. Prior to our meeting, she wanted to call me in advance, and also she wanted to listen to my voice samples. Her initial gut feeling after asking me couple of questions, was that my child is probably slightly delayed in communication, and he is just starting. She cancelled our appointment and told me to send a new video with voice samples, and to report his progress in 3 weeks. I will list the questions and situations that she found to be positive, as I guess many parents worry about autism like myself. Obviously, she hasn't seen my son, so there is no guarantee but she felt that we should give him a little more time.

Although autism spectrum is large, these are the situations that lead her to believe that there are no major red flags for now:

1. When he is on a swing in the park parallel to another baby, he was staring at the other baby's mother. He was giggling loudly every time she made funny voices and faces to her own swinging baby. He was constantly looking at the baby and his mom, and smiling a lot. I assume this shows he is interested in other people.

2. In the store, he was hearing a baby doing baby sounds. He did not copy the babbling, but he would respond in his own sounds and melody. The baby yells, he yells. The baby babbles "lalala", he responds "eyoeyooo". He basically copied the more basic sounds, but is still having trouble to copy the consonants. In addition, when I speak to him in soft baby voice, he copies the melody. It sounds as if he is imitating the soft melody of the language, but he can't produce the syllables yet. The therapist felt that he is just starting to copy and immitate, so he might be a little behind, but he can develop this skill soon.

3. He is making some attempts at clapping. Just few days ago, he didn't pay any attention to clapping, while recently he is grabbing my hands and repeatedly claps them when I start clapping. I scream "Bravooo", and he responds with his soft singsong speech melody and he looks very excited. The therapist felt that maybe this a precursor of real clapping, and he is just beginning to learn to bang objects together. She hopes that he will start clapping on his own in couple of weeks.

4. He is also starting to follow my point, when I point at something or the mirror. He is also starting to give me a toy, if I open my hands and say "give me". I think he is responding to me opening the hands, rather than the command. The therapist felt that he is just starting at this milestone, and he will need some more time to get better that them.

5. He is making attempts at babbling, although very sporadic. His voice samples are indeed variegated babbling, but the intonation is still the same, and it feels as if he is very uncertain when he does it. We are hoping that as time goes by, he will begin to babble more often. Some days he doesn't do it as much, or even at all, but then we see him working on a new skill. For example, we didn't hear any babbling at all for few days, but we saw him trying to stand, cruise on furtniture, and for a first time, he is crawling properly. He did only an "army crawl" for 4 months!

Dear Mary Lou, and all other professionals, or parents with experience, please comment on any of the above items, or share if you have a second opinion. I am very greateful for all your help!

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