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Lrghtp  
#1 Posted : Friday, July 4, 2014 7:02:29 PM(UTC)
Lrghtp

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/4/2014(UTC)
Posts: 3
Canada

Thanks: 2 times
Hello All

Thank you for running this forum and allowing users to ask questions.

I have a baby that is 8.5 months now; will be 9 months old on July 15th. She was born at 39.5 weeks gestation and so far she has been very healthy (i.e. no health concerns). In particular, she has not had any ear infections.

She had her hearing checked at birth (in the hospital) and passed the test. We have a full hearing test scheduled in about 2 weeks, but frankly I don't think that's going to be the problem. She turns to noises and even gets spooked by loud noises. If I'm trying to put her down for a nap and she hears people talking downstairs in the house she will crane her neck to see what is going on (not wanting to miss the 'party'). :-)

She is a very quiet child. It takes a lot of work to get her to make any sounds. We talk to her, sing to her, imitate any noises she makes - but mostly there are no noises one can imitate as she is silent.
She is a very content and 'easy' baby who does not cry often and is generally not fussy. She is quite smiley and she giggles too. She started blowing raspberries at 5 months and we thought we were on track, but then she did not progress.

Once in a blue moon she is in a 'talkative mood' and will 'talk' for an hour straight. This consists of wovels (aaahh, eeeh), but I've also heard "aaa-gooo" and "gaaah". She also seems to be making a rolling /r/ (no vowels, just rolling an 'r' type sound). She also has fun making a lip smacking type sound.
No bababa or dadada or mamamma or gagaga - no repetitive babbling at all.
If she makes any sounds we immediately imitate her back and sometimes we can get a good back and forth going. She seems to really enjoy that, watches us intently and waits for our response, then responds back. The sad part is how infrequently this happens.

Here are some of the other things she does:

1. Follows a finger pointing but doesn't point yet.

2. Loves playing peekaboo but does not yet initiate it yet. Peekaboo gets a lot of big smiles from her.

3. Just starting to play pat-a-cake

4. Interested in everything around her (including all the things she is not supposed to pick up...)

5. Mom and Dad get big smiles from her when we walk into the room or when we pick her up from her crib.

6. If we sing to her, it gets a lot of big smiles. We tried interrupting the song suddenly (before the end) to get a response from her, but with no luck.

7. Bangs toys together, good fine motor skills.

8. Loves our dogs, seems to know their name, laughs and tries to grab them.

9. Makes an attempt to crawl but the attempts so far are very ineffective. Sits very well without support but she does not yet get into sitting position on her on. She does not yet pull to stand, but she does stand very solid when holding onto something.

10. She seems to know her name and respond to it most all the time, except when she's busy playing with a toy.

I can't figure out what gets her in a 'talkative mood', and sadly, it does not happen often (less than once a week). We've registered for speech assessment, but the wait list is nearly 9 months long. By that time Mommy will be a nervous wreck! As it is I am losing a lot of sleep over what's wrong.

We have been directed to Hanen.org website and watched the video and book 'It takes Two to Talk". We are following their advice with making sure we are face to face, exaggerating the words we say, repeating the words lots and so on.

We wait for an opportunity to imitate when she says, but she does not say much. If she is silent, we talk to her and babble to her. We have been repeating to her 'dadada', 'bababa' and 'mamama' lots but without much success.

Sometimes the intervals between the 'talkative moods' are so long that I wonder if I remembered them correctly!!

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
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Mary Lou SLP  
#2 Posted : Sunday, July 6, 2014 3:34:04 PM(UTC)
Mary Lou SLP

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/21/2008(UTC)
Posts: 903
Location: Colorado

Was thanked: 3 time(s) in 3 post(s)
Hi Lrghtp,

It is always a treat to read a post from a parent who clearly is an excellent observer of her child's abilities. You have provided a very thorough description. I have heard many parents recently talk about their very quiet infants. I must look for a longitudinal study that shows how a large sample of "quiet" children did with their language and speech at older ages (3 years, 5 years, etc.)

I think you are wise to have signed up for a speech assessment. I can see how you don't relish waiting and worrying for the 9-month waiting period. Do you have any alternatives to such a long wait, such as getting your physician to request quicker assessment, getting a private assessment, getting on a call list for a short-notice appointment due to a cancellation? From what you have written, I think it would be very wise and provide you with piece of mind and information if your daughter could be assessed by a developmental pediatrician and/or a speech-language pathologist and a physical therapist.

Does your daughter make eye contact with you frequently? What are her feeding/eating skills and preferences like?

I hope you will write again and that others will respond to your post.

Best wishes!

Mary Lou
Mary Lou B. Johnson, M.S.,CCC-SLP

http://www.HelpYourChildSpeak.com
thanks 1 user thanked Mary Lou SLP for this useful post.
Lrghtp on 7/6/2014(UTC)
Lrghtp  
#3 Posted : Sunday, July 6, 2014 6:21:53 PM(UTC)
Lrghtp

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/4/2014(UTC)
Posts: 3
Canada

Thanks: 2 times
Hi Mary Lou;

Thank you so much for your reply.

I did in fact made contact with a speech pathologist to come an evaluation (as a private patient). It is not cheap but I've had enough of sleepless night (because of worry about my little one). She emphasized that usually kids get assessed at over one year of age, and because my little one is so young, there are limits to what we can do. Nevertheless, I am hoping that at the very least she can observe our interactions with our baby and help "optimize" it so that we can help her the most.

We have had a good weekend. The grandparents were visiting on Saturday and there was lots of "adult talk" as well as lots of doting on her. That got her in a 'talkative mood' in the afternoon. We have noticed before that "busy social situations" help her become talkative. We have been taking her to the local "Family Resource Centre" where they have "baby time" with stories and singing, but for some reason that tends not to do it for her - i.e. she is silent there too. So now we are looking at different 'baby time' opportunities (at the public library, etc.) to see if we can find one where she feels motivated to talk.

Sunday we also poured lots of effort into babbling/talking to her and managed to get her to "talk". It ended up being quite a long back-and-forth "conversation".

Her "conversations" go like this:
She makes some sort of sound - it does not matter what it is, we imitate it. Sometimes we even imitate a little cough or sneeze (beggars can't be choosers).
She looks up at us and you can see the little light go on her head that this is a 'conversation'. We make sure we give her time to reply.
She 'replies' by typically making a "aaaah" sound. It is really more of a yell than a babble in that it can be quite loud, full throat sound. Sometimes it is short, sometimes longer. It varies in pitch. Sometimes it's more of an 'eeee' but mostly it's 'aaah'. The whole time she watches us intently and seems very satisfied when we imitate her back. Then within 3-10 seconds she 'replies' back. It is really, really obvious that she knows she is 'talking' with us rather than babbling on her own. My husband always makes his reply very animated, by making faces, waving his hands, and so on. She really seems to like that.

After a few rounds of 'aaah' we try to introduce other sounds like 'gaaah' or 'goo-gaah' or 'dadada aaaah' in our reply. She keeps her replies 'aaah' but sometimes replies with 'gaaah'.

When we can get a back-and-forth exchange going like this, it makes our day. And this weekend we were able to get her 'talking' both Saturday and Sunday, which makes for a very good weekend in our books!

By now she only wakes once a night for feeding. It is interesting that when she is only half-awake and I'm checking her diaper, that she tends to 'babble' on, half asleep. Lots of fairly quiet 'goooh, gaaah' and rolling /r/ and sound in between I can't necessarily imitate. She often does this while lying on the change table. She also tends to do that before naps. when she is quite tired. These are not back-and-forth conversations, just her babbling away when she is super sleepy.

Occasionally after her feeding she does not want to go back to sleep and will spend an hour (or at least it feels like and hour at 2 a.m.!) quietly babbling away. Again, no repetitive babbling, no dada mama baba, just raspberries, rolling /r/, go-gah type noises. I could try to put her back in her crib but I'm just so happy hearing her babble that I sit there at 2 a.m., dead tired but happy to hear her vocalize.

Worried about this being a sign of autism, I've googled 'early signs of autism', but I don't think that's her. She makes lots of eye contact, she wants to be picked up and held, she has lots of smiles, giggles, enjoys cuddles and affection, enjoys social situations with grandma and grandpa... no repetitive/self stim behaviours.

Any comments/suggestions would be greatly appreciated! Thank you for taking your time reading this.
Mary Lou SLP  
#4 Posted : Monday, July 7, 2014 3:37:24 PM(UTC)
Mary Lou SLP

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/21/2008(UTC)
Posts: 903
Location: Colorado

Was thanked: 3 time(s) in 3 post(s)
It sounds like you are on to something with the "busy social situations" that occurred this weekend with your daughter's grandparents. How nice that you got to hear her "talk" more! What occurred that may be different from what usually happens? Can you try to replicate such "social interactions"? It sounds like you and your husband try to do this. I'd suggest doing the animated talking and sound making with varied facial expressions and arm movements more often during the day. In addition to sounds and nonsense syllables, how about trying to make anything and everything sound as appealing as possible? You may have read about my Upside-Down Pyramid method on this site. Basically, my method is to say anything at all in sentence form, then reduce what is said, systematically, until you get to a small enough unit that a child feels like trying to copy. Your pause time is excellent, as you wait for her to take a "turn". Keep doing this! Here are some examples:

I'm going to change your diaper!
Poo-ee...change your diaper!
Poooo-eeee!


Daddy's coming home now!
Let's go see Daddy!
Daddy!
Daaadeeee!
Dada!


It's time to make your supper.
It's time to eat.
Let's eat.
Eeeeat!
Eeeeat!
Eeeeat!


You can repeat the final word, syllable, or sound several times, waiting each time for a response.

Though the events at the Family Resource Centre may become fun over time, I'd bank more on what she is going to gain from you, your husband, her grandparents, and other special people.

Please keep posting so we can learn what you feel helps your daughter the most, over time!

Mary Lou

Edited by user Monday, July 7, 2014 3:38:05 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Mary Lou B. Johnson, M.S.,CCC-SLP

http://www.HelpYourChildSpeak.com
thanks 1 user thanked Mary Lou SLP for this useful post.
Lrghtp on 8/13/2014(UTC)
Lrghtp  
#5 Posted : Wednesday, August 13, 2014 1:46:55 PM(UTC)
Lrghtp

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/4/2014(UTC)
Posts: 3
Canada

Thanks: 2 times
Thanks for the suggestions... sorry for the late follow-up, but life has a way of getting really busy.

So we went for the hearing test and everything was normal, as we suspected. They did not completely finish the testing as my little one got very tired (she missed her nap because of the appt), so we are going back for a follow-up when she is one year old, but all the testing that was done was OK.

She was also assessed by a speech language therapist. In her report she stated that my little one was indeed very quiet, but given her young age that did not necessarily mean a speech delay and might be simply an indication of her personality. (I really won't have a problem with a quiet child, if she does turn out to be one, as I'm not an extrovert myself...)

Her report arrived about 2 weeks after the assessment, and *on that very same day* my little girl started canonical babbling ('da-da-da'...)!!!

I almost had tears in my eyes, I was so happy.

Since then (she turns 10 months old in 2 days) we have 'yayaya' and 'dadada' and 'gagaga' and a few other sounds that don't necessarily corresponds to English sounds (e.g. sounds in between 'g' and 'd'). We also have 'ba' but not yet 'baba'. We do not yet have 'mama'. We also have a few syllables like 'agoo' and 'go-aaah' and a few other 'fake' 2 syllable 'words'.

Over the last month or so she has become more vocal. She noticed that if she is left alone - for example if we are in the kitchen for no more than a few minutes and she is in the dining room - and she starts talking/yelling, we come running to see what's up. So now the moment she is left alone she starts babbling and if we don't appear in seconds she increases her volume. If we take 'too long' to return to her she starts yelling. :-)

We continue to take her to the library and the local 'family resource centre' for "baby time" activities to give her more social opportunities.

We are hoping to see a "specific" 'dada' soon. (So far 'dada' is non-specific and does not refer to Dad.)

(p.s. I'm also realizing that I'm a bit too anxious about her development for no good reason at all, and I need to relax!)
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