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Laurie99  
#1 Posted : Tuesday, August 9, 2011 6:35:49 PM(UTC)
Laurie99

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/9/2011(UTC)
Posts: 2

Hi,

My daughter will be 10 months old this month. She has never babbled, never really cooed even. She grunts, and she hums sometimes (typically when she hums, she will do the same 2 notes, hum-hmmm, and then wait for me to repeat the same tones back to her.) She has very good receptive language, she points objects out when you ask her where they are, she claps when you ask her if she wants to play patty cake, she gives kisses when you ask, that kind of thing. She loves listening to music, loves it when you sing to her. She just doesn't make noise. She *can* make noise, she just prefers not to. She doesn't even really cry that much, even as a newborn. She At her 9 month checkup, her ped sent us for a hearing test, which she passed with flying colors. Our next step would be a speech evaluation, and her dr says we can do it now or wait til her 12 month appt, and here is where my question comes in.

My gut says she definitely needs to be evaluated. My older 2 children were all early talkers, though, and I want to make sure that I am not trying to compare her to them. My husband thinks it is ridiculous to have a 10 month old in speech therapy, and thinks that she is just fine and all she needs is time, or that she isn't using her voice because she just has no need to. Is he right? Should I give her more time and stop worrying? Or should I be scheduling an evaluation tomorrow?
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Mary Lou SLP  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, August 10, 2011 3:00:08 AM(UTC)
Mary Lou SLP

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/21/2008(UTC)
Posts: 903
Location: Colorado

Was thanked: 3 time(s) in 3 post(s)
Hi Laurie99,

I find your observations very interesting. I trust a mother's intuition, and I support your interest in learning more about why your daughter doesn't/can't use her voice. The fact that she has never cried much, even as a newborn, and currently she doesn't babble vowel-like sounds, is of concern. When you say she did not cry, do you mean she did not become upset very much or that she was upset but no sound came out? If the latter, you actually may want to schedule an appointment with a pediatric Ear, Nose, Throat (ENT) doctor and ask to have her larynx viewed with a nasal endoscope. A thin flexible cable with a small camera on the end is carefully threaded through her nostril and down her trachea just above the larynx. There is no anesthesia required, and you can hold her. You need to find out if her voice-making structure (her larynx) is normal.

I am perplexed by your husband's comment that your daughter doesn't use her voice "because she doesn't need to." What child doesn't "need" to vocalize? Does your daughter make eye contact and smile at you? Does she laugh?

It is terrific that your daughter understands you! That lets you know that her language skills are developing. She deserves to have an expressive communication outlet, though, so by going to a speech-language pathologist for an assessment, and perhaps for some therapy sessions, you can get information about using some simple sign language or alternative communication such as learning to point to or give little pictures to you to express her wants and needs. Speech-language therapy at her age would be geared more toward giving you and your husband additional knowledge and techniques to use to help your daughter learn to communicate with you and also to promote using her voice and learning to speak.

I'd say call to ask your doctor about the merits of an ENT evaluation and then to call for a S-L evaluation with an SLP who works with parents and young children. It may take a few months to get in anyway, so you are still doing some of the "waiting" your husband mentioned. I wouldn't suggest "waiting" a long time, though.

While you are waiting for these appointments, try making lots of vowel sounds toward your daughter in play and other fun interactions with a big, open mouth: ahhhh, o-e...., ooooo, owwww. Smile and laugh a lot. I'd urge you to make a videotape of her grunts and her humming, because she isn't likely to demonstrate these during an assessment, and it would be good for the SLP and ENT to get to hear what these sound like.

I really hope you will write back when you learn more! I have never encountered this report from a parent during my 36 year career (+ 2 years in training). I am interested to learn more.

Best wishes!

Mary Lou
Mary Lou B. Johnson, M.S.,CCC-SLP

http://www.HelpYourChildSpeak.com
Laurie99  
#3 Posted : Wednesday, August 10, 2011 4:09:00 AM(UTC)
Laurie99

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/9/2011(UTC)
Posts: 2

When I say she didn't really cry, I mean she never got upset enough really to cry. She definitely can cry if she gets upset enough, it just very rarely happens. We get comments all the time on what a "good" baby she is. Even strangers at restaurants or grocery stores will comment on how quiet she is.

She does smile and laugh, all the time, and will occasionally even squeal when she laughs. She is a very happy baby, albeit somewhat shy around strangers. I think his comment on not needing to vocalize is because he feels we anticipate her needs and respond very quickly. I would agree that that may be a reason why she rarely cries (she sleeps in bed with us, nurses on demand, and I am more likely to wear her in a baby carrier than I am to put her in a shopping cart or stroller.) But I still feel that even if she has no reason to vocalize due to being upset about something, doesn't mean she wouldn't vocalize just because. It seems like a normal part of development that she is missing out on.


I have a few videos of her grunting, but none of her humming because she gets more interested in the camera than humming with me. We do talk to her all the time, and have tried modeling vowels sounds but she just looks at us, or laughs. She never seems interested in imitating what we say. The only time we can get her to copy a sound is with the humming, and she is usually the one to initiate that, but she thinks it's a great game.

When she passed her hearing test, we got an automatic referral to the infant development center so we can have her evaluated further. They actually just called me back this morning, and I have an appointment for Thursday. She said over the phone that the appointment wasn't an evaluation, but just to see if we might qualify for one. I'm not really sure how that works, but luckily we live in a town that's big enough to have services like these readily available, but small enough that we are not overrun with people needing the services.

The only other thing I can possibly think of that may be related to her speech something she would do as a newborn. Up until she was about 3 months, she would sometimes out of nowhere make a loud gasping sort of noise. My husband called it her "dolphin noise." Her pediatrician never seemed concerned about it though, and just said they would think about investigating it if she was still doing it by her four month appointment, and she wasn't. That makes me wonder if she does have issues with her larynx.

I will definitely keep you updated what happens. You have given me a lot to think about, thank you.
Mary Lou SLP  
#4 Posted : Wednesday, August 10, 2011 5:40:50 PM(UTC)
Mary Lou SLP

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/21/2008(UTC)
Posts: 903
Location: Colorado

Was thanked: 3 time(s) in 3 post(s)
Hi Laurie,

That is outstanding that you have an appointment already to talk with someone about whether an evaluation seems appropriate! The way you described where you live sounds terrific--large enough to have good services but not so large that services are swamped.

I thought more about your post when I went to work this morning, and with your added information about the "gasp" you heard when she was an infant, I really think you should press to have the laryngeal exam. You have nothing to lose (no downside) and much to gain if something is visualized.

Has your daughter been a noisy breather at all? Did she have reflux?

Yes, please, do write back what you learn!

Mary Lou
Mary Lou B. Johnson, M.S.,CCC-SLP

http://www.HelpYourChildSpeak.com
Marta_S  
#5 Posted : Wednesday, September 7, 2011 7:31:44 AM(UTC)
Marta_S

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 9/7/2011(UTC)
Posts: 1
Location: Ottawa

Hi Laurie99,
I just found your post accidentally, when looking for answers for my 15 months boy's problem with speech. We also co-slept and nursed on demand, and he generally was very quiet and happy baby. At his 9-month check-up with the public health nurse, he was not saying the sounds he was supposed to, and would only say "wa" and not "ba" and "da". So I started to get worried and after doing some readings, I decided to remove gluten from his diet. And after 2-3 days he repeated phrases after us, like he was able to repeat "Hi, Daddy". We kept him off gluten for the most part (and I was gluten free as well because of breastfeeding) and we tried to reintroduce gluten about 3 times and the same thing happens again. We did it actually just past week because his pediatrician wanted to do some tests, and he lost most of his words within 2 days.
I don't know if you are willing to go gluten free for your girl, but I would be very interested to find out if she'll react the same and maybe start saying more things.
Best of luck!
Marta
Mary Lou SLP  
#6 Posted : Wednesday, September 7, 2011 1:59:25 PM(UTC)
Mary Lou SLP

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/21/2008(UTC)
Posts: 903
Location: Colorado

Was thanked: 3 time(s) in 3 post(s)
Hi Marta S,

When I read your post, my first thought was, "Surely gluten can't cause these huge changes in speech and language production." I then did a search on the internet and read some compelling information written by an MD who stated that gluten intolerance CAN cause major neurological disruption. The article went on to say that 1% of the population reacts to gluten. It also indicated that a blood test can ascertain if an individual reacts to gluten, so that may be something parents should consider rather than just doing gluten challenges in the diet. If anyone reading suspects gluten is affecting his or her child's development, I would suggest reading a lot of information and discussing concerns with the doctor.
Mary Lou B. Johnson, M.S.,CCC-SLP

http://www.HelpYourChildSpeak.com
Angieb128  
#7 Posted : Saturday, April 5, 2014 10:37:58 PM(UTC)
Angieb128

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 4/5/2014(UTC)
Posts: 1
United States
Location: Michigan

Hello,
My daughter sounds exactly your daughter Laurie99...I know this post is 2 years old but could you give me an update?
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